Hun Sen Raps ‘Bad Deeds’ Of Politicians

Second Prime Minister Hun Sen said Saturday that Cambo­dians don’t deserve the economic difficulties caused by a continuing political stalemate.

In a broadcast aired on state-run TVK, he told reporters in Takhmau that new investors are afraid to come to Cambodia, tax col­lection is down, and government paychecks are late because of the opposition’s refusal to help form a new government.

“I don’t think Cambodians deserve the bad deeds from difficulties created by politicians,” he said. He reiterated a plan to keep the current government with First Prime Minister Ung Huot if a coalition can’t be formed.

He didn’t directly ad­dress the protest led by Funcin­pec and Sam Rainsy. But he did so in a letter sent Aug 27 to a foreigner who was pursued by protesters last week after circulating anti-Funcinpec, anti-Muslim leaflets.

“I have pity on you…because you wanted to express your idea which is different from those of the demonstration leaders,” Hun Sen wrote to Paul Gerard, also known as Ge­­rard Be Le. “I want to draw your attention to the fact that democracy is growing in Cam­bo­dia…but this democracy is not exactly on the lips of those who proudly say they are democracy-lovers.”

The CPP central com­mittee on Thursday issued a separate statement detailing ways Sam Rainsy has “broken” the law. Alle­ged unlawful acts in­clude trespas­sing on Ministry of In­­te­rior property, holding an un­au­thorized rally, cursing government officials and damaging public pro­perty.

The statement reiterated allegations that Sam Rainsy planned a grenade attack on his own protesters, and that he had tried to provoke violence by asking the US to launch missiles aimed at Hun Sen’s military base: “This party and this man must take res­ponsibility before the law for the difficulties which have occurred through the immoral acts.”

Sam Rainsy has said the government is trying to frame him  in order to stop a protest that is within his constitutional rights.

 

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